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INTELLECTUAL TOYS FOR CHILDREN - INTELLECTUAL TOYS


Intellectual toys for children - Top boys toys 2011 - Magnetix toys.



Intellectual Toys For Children





intellectual toys for children






    for children
  • A phrase use to indicate that a task is meant for use by children and not adults, and the failure of another adult to complete said task is embarrassing and unacceptable.

  • For Children (Hungarian: A Gyermekeknek) is a cycle of short piano pieces composed by Bela Bartok. The collection was originally written in 1908-11, and comprised 85 pieces which were issued in four volumes.





    intellectual
  • a person who uses the mind creatively

  • Appealing to or requiring use of the intellect

  • Of or relating to the intellect

  • Possessing a highly developed intellect

  • appealing to or using the intellect; "satire is an intellectual weapon"; "intellectual workers engaged in creative literary or artistic or scientific labor"; "has tremendous intellectual sympathy for oppressed people"; "coldly intellectual"; "sort of the intellectual type"; "intellectual literature"

  • of or associated with or requiring the use of the mind; "intellectual problems"; "the triumph of the rational over the animal side of man"





    toys
  • A person treated by another as a source of pleasure or amusement rather than with due seriousness

  • (toy) dally: behave carelessly or indifferently; "Play about with a young girl's affection"

  • (toy) a nonfunctional replica of something else (frequently used as a modifier); "a toy stove"

  • An object, esp. a gadget or machine, regarded as providing amusement for an adult

  • (toy) plaything: an artifact designed to be played with

  • An object for a child to play with, typically a model or miniature replica of something











Begijnhof of Amsterdam




Begijnhof of Amsterdam






with the Holga

Begijnhof's (Beguinages in French) are found throughout the Low Countries. Their residents, beguines, were single, often widowed, women who lived in houses surrounding a sequestered courtyard. The begijnhof had close ties with the Church and were committed to charitable works. Beguines were required to take a vow of chastity and attend daily mass, but unlike the situation of a convent, the women were allowed to leave at any time and generally enjoyed more freedom than nuns.

March 11, 2011

The fabled city of Amsterdam- one of those cities that is known worldwide by its name alone. It’s the mother city- mother of modern capitalism, mother of tolerance, mother of the modern republic, and for a New Yorker, still fondly remembered as the mother city of NYC. The city was also a very brief stopover of the Pilgrims that eventually made their way to Massachusetts.

For all these things, it seems a proud city- full of life, confidence, and openness - a rare place of “live and let live”- a comfortably casual yet refined town, not without its downsides of course, but somehow a very positive place…

It’s a visually beautiful place as well- canals and water everywhere, the staid houses of the 17th century well-to-do, its parks and churches and gardens.

Amsterdam had one of the greatest runs in history. It’s a relatively new city- settled around the 1200’s, when the Amstel River was dammed. (The place of “The Dam” still exists). It remained relatively obscure for a few centuries, and so, was never a center of Medieval culture, and thus, never firmly established the feudal institutions and extreme religion of that age.

The city didn’t rise to prominence until after 1588, when the Dutch Republic drove out the Spanish Empire during the Eighty Years War. As the first modern Republic, it was not bound by a totalitarian religious and political regime. Its policy of relative religious freedom drew in Europe’s misfits- Huguenots, Jews, and traders and artists driven out of the cities of Southern Netherlands (modern Belgium), especially from the formerly prosperous Antwerp.

Its policy of free trade inspired the city to become an economic powerhouse- the first major mercantile city of the Modern era. It spread its influence far and wide, establishing bases and colonies in Africa, Asia, Oceania, and the Americas. At its height, it was the most prosperous city on Earth. The magnitude of the city’s wealth at this time can still be seen along the canal rings, where the houses of the merchant class still stand proudly. Its stock market, founded in 1602, is the oldest continually operating exchange in the world. It was also an intellectual and artistic center of Europe, the home of painters such as Rembrandt, and philosophers such as Spinoza.

In 1609, the Dutch West India Company, one of two major arms of Dutch trade, hired the English explorer, Henry Hudson, to find a northerly route to Asia. Instead, he found the American river that still bears his name. In 1624, on an island where that river meets the sea, a colony was established called New Amsterdam, which eventually became a city that had its own unprecedented run in the 19th and 20th centuries.

Though the Dutch only held New Amsterdam for a few decades, the similarities between the mother and its child are striking. Historical Amsterdam is huddled around a ring of canals and has a bustling, congested feel, full of pedestrians, trams, cars, and bicycles darting here and there. In its heyday, the city was the preeminent commercial city of the world, much as New York was in its prime. Amsterdam drew the misfits of the world under a spirit of openness, much like NYC has done. As an artistic and intellectual center, it is home to world-class museums and orchestras, as well as ambitious and successful artists. The two cities also draw a constellation of tourists, some decidedly obnoxious.

There are plenty of differences. For instance, we learned very quickly (and hungrily), that Amsterdam is a city that sleeps- after midnight, the town goes quiet. And despite the congestion, it is not a frenetically driven city. People take more time.

No matter all these things, it is wonderfully unique city. Charming, beautiful, refined, seedy, free-spirited- a place of many dimensions.






















with the Diana

Somewhat interesting that the official insignia of a city known for its vices should have an "xxx" pattern- The 3 x's have been used since the 1200's though.

March 11, 2011

The fabled city of Amsterdam- one of those cities that is known worldwide by its name alone. It’s the mother city- mother of modern capitalism, mother of tolerance, mother of the modern republic, and for a New Yorker, still fondly remembered as the mother city of NYC. The city was also a very brief stopover of the Pilgrims that eventually made their way to Massachusetts.

For all these things, it seems a proud city- full of life, confidence, and openness - a rare place of “live and let live”- a comfortably casual yet refined town, not without its downsides of course, but somehow a very positive place…

It’s a visually beautiful place as well- canals and water everywhere, the staid houses of the 17th century well-to-do, its parks and churches and gardens.

Amsterdam had one of the greatest runs in history. It’s a relatively new city- settled around the 1200’s, when the Amstel River was dammed. (The place of “The Dam” still exists). It remained relatively obscure for a few centuries, and so, was never a center of Medieval culture, and thus, never firmly established the feudal institutions and extreme religion of that age.

The city didn’t rise to prominence until after 1588, when the Dutch Republic drove out the Spanish Empire during the Eighty Years War. As the first modern Republic, it was not bound by a totalitarian religious and political regime. Its policy of relative religious freedom drew in Europe’s misfits- Huguenots, Jews, and traders and artists driven out of the cities of Southern Netherlands (modern Belgium), especially from the formerly prosperous Antwerp.

Its policy of free trade inspired the city to become an economic powerhouse- the first major mercantile city of the Modern era. It spread its influence far and wide, establishing bases and colonies in Africa, Asia, Oceania, and the Americas. At its height, it was the most prosperous city on Earth. The magnitude of the city’s wealth at this time can still be seen along the canal rings, where the houses of the merchant class still stand proudly. Its stock market, founded in 1602, is the oldest continually operating exchange in the world. It was also an intellectual and artistic center of Europe, the home of painters such as Rembrandt, and philosophers such as Spinoza.

In 1609, the Dutch West India Company, one of two major arms of Dutch trade, hired the English explorer, Henry Hudson, to find a northerly route to Asia. Instead, he found the American river that still bears his name. In 1624, on an island where that river meets the sea, a colony was established called New Amsterdam, which eventually became a city that had its own unprecedented run in the 19th and 20th centuries.

Though the Dutch only held New Amsterdam for a few decades, the similarities between the mother and its child are striking. Historical Amsterdam is huddled around a ring of canals and has a bustling, congested feel, full of pedestrians, trams, cars, and bicycles darting here and there. In its heyday, the city was the preeminent commercial city of the world, much as New York was in its prime. Amsterdam drew the misfits of the world under a spirit of openness, much like NYC has done. As an artistic and intellectual center, it is home to world-class museums and orchestras, as well as ambitious and successful artists. The two cities also draw a constellation of tourists, some decidedly obnoxious.

There are plenty of differences. For instance, we learned very quickly (and hungrily), that Amsterdam is a city that sleeps- after midnight, the town goes quiet. And despite the congestion, it is not a frenetically driven city. People take more time.

No matter all these things, it is wonderfully unique city. Charming, beautiful, refined, seedy, free-spirited- a place of many dimensions.









intellectual toys for children







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